Abhinivesa

Life’s journey hands us dark and difficult times. According to Patanjali’s yoga sutras, Kleshas are obstacles or hindrances that specifically add to our suffering. Patanjali shares in sutra 2.12, that all human suffering – whether physical, psychological, philosophical, or metaphysical – is attributed to the five Kleshas. You can read more about the first four in my other blog posts. …

Dvesha

Kleshas are obstacles or hindrances in our lives that cause suffering. The fourth Kelsha, Dvesha, means hate or aversion. While it’s good to avoid touching a hot stove or try not to breathe polluted air, when we avoidance works against us, we need to be aware. Constantly think about how much we don’t want something invests life energy that could …

Raga

Raga means attachment. The third Klesha is all about desire and possessiveness. When we hold on to things with a tight grip, we are not staying open and flexible to the inevitable changes that occur in life, people, places, and things. Therefore, our desires can become an affliction when it creates suffering. Think about your body. Is it the same …

Abyasa and Vairagya

Vairagya is the Sanskrit term describing a state of letting go of attachments. Often, this term is defined as “detachment”. The Yoga sutras tell us the core principles of yoga are abhyasa “practice” and vairagya. When we come to our mat or meditate, we experience abhyasa. When we work to become better at something, we are in abhyasa. We can …

The Courage of Satya

The five Yamas are part of Pantanjali’s eight limbs of yoga. Each limb represents an aspect of yoga to help you discover a deeper connection to your highest Self. The Yamas, as a group, represent the first limb. All the Yamas build on and relate to each other. They are interconnected, yet each presents an area to delve deeper into …

The Yamas Part 1: Your Kindest You – Exploring Ahimsa

The five Yamas are part of Pantanjali’s eight limbs of yoga. Each limb represents an aspect of yoga to help you discover a deeper connection to your highest Self. The Yamas, as a group, represent the first limb. The first Yama, Ahimsa means non-harming. I prefer stating things in the affirmative rather than negative, so I like to think of …

A Tiny Gratitude Practice for the Next 7 Days

As we approach Thanksgiving and the holiday season, it’s natural to reflect on what we’re thankful for.  In yoga, the closest concept to gratitude in Santosha – contentment.  This is one of the eight limbs of yoga – yes, yoga is so much more than our movement through asanas. One way to practice Santosha is to focus on what we’re …

Finding Calm in the Chaos

Friday morning was enlightening. Not Nirvana enlightening. Eye opening enlightening. On my day off, right before getting ready to go into meditation at a yoga workshop, I checked to make sure my phone was off. And there it was. A text. From my boss. Her boss, the Queen of Chaos, was in crisis mode – again. I spent the first …

Brave Bunny and Believing in Yourself

I love bunnies. I was born in the year of the rabbit. I’ve been told my spirit animal is a bunny and I can wiggle my nose like one too. I was taking a walk through my neighborhood the other day and saw this little bunny pestering some wild doves. He would playfully run at them and it felt like …

Does Kindness Extend to Your “Self”?

Yesterday, I was posed two questions,”Do you tell lies?” and “Do you keep your word?”  It wasn’t that I was being accused of dishonesty or mistrust with others. In fact, I try very hard to keep my word and share my truth, while of course, being kind to people in my life. It’s of utmost importance to me. The questions …